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Monsters Inc.


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Monsters Inc.


There's a reason why there are monsters in children's closets—it's their job. Monsters, Inc. is the most successful scream-processing factory in the monster world, and there is no better Scarer than James P. Sullivan. But when "Sulley" accidentally lets a little human girl into Monstropolis, life turns upside down for him and his buddy Mike.


Trailers

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Character Design


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Character Design


Finding Boo

Having given monsters James P. “Sulley” Sullivan and Mike Wazowski the most prestigious job in Monstropolis—Scarer—the filmmakers needed to find the right kid to scare. The character of Boo only emerged after several story changes. “Ultimately we needed the kid to be as cute and appealing as it gets, and we decided it’s hard to beat a two-year-old girl for that,” explains Director Pete Docter.


Story Is King

Fur

Characters

Animation

Story Pitch


James P. “Sulley” Sullivan

James P. “Sulley” Sullivan may be the most celebrated Scarer in Monstropolis, but that doesn't make him mean. When the softhearted monster has to care for Boo, he discovers that love and laughter are more powerful than making kids scream.

 

Mike Wazowski

Sulley's scare assistant, best friend, and roommate doesn't want any interruptions in his life—especially in his relationships. Although Mike thinks Boo is a "killing machine" at first, he later finds she's a great audience for his natural comedic talent.

 

Boo

Boo has a vocabulary of about three words, but that doesn't stop this curious human girl from stealing Sulley's heart and overcoming her fear of Randall.

 

Randall Boggs

Able to scare even his co-workers with his chameleon abilities, Randall is one of the most wicked monsters in Monstropolis. His plan to capture the all-time scare record only scratches the surface of his sinister agenda.

 

Henry J. Waternoose III

Monsters, Inc. has been in the Waternoose family for generations, and Henry J. Waternoose III will do anything to beat the scream shortage and make his company profitable again.

 

Roz

Dispatch Manager Roz may be slow moving and slow talking, but the quick-witted slug has her eye on everything—including Mike Wazowski’s lack of paperwork. She's a No. 1 nut in Mike's book and a No. 1 boss to others.

 

Celia

The factory's one-eyed, snake-haired receptionist must put her birthday celebration on hold as she gets caught in the middle of Sulley and Mike's crazy predicament. Luckily, her love for Mike prevails and she comes to his rescue.

 

Yeti

Known as the Abominable Snowman to humans, this banished monster spends his time in the cold Himalayas making lemon-flavored snow cones.

 

George Sanderson

This easygoing monster has the worst of luck, coming into contact with human items and attracting the attention of the Child Detection Agency (CDA), no thanks to his tattletale Scare assistant.

 

Monsters

Research had played a key role in previous Pixar films; the creative team had toured toy stores for Toy Story and crawled around with insects for A Bug’s Life. But monsters did not lend themselves to scrutiny. A trip to the public library was largely unproductive.

Interviews with kids revealed that while they believed in monsters, they were hazy on the details. The filmmakers finally decided to unleash artists and illustrators to create monsters from their own imagination. “Given the choice between serious study and making it up….we decided to just make it up,” says Pete Docter.

 

Child Detection Agency

Saving Monstropolis from human contamination is no small task. Clad in yellow suits, the highly trained Child Detection Agency (CDA) teams work around the clock eliminating wayward human goods and disinfecting hapless monsters. Nothing gets past these guys—not even a sock.

 
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World Design


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World Design


The Door

As most kids know, a closet door is one of the few things capable of keeping monsters at bay. With this simple dividing line, the Pixar team created worlds for both sides of the door. Each side had its own rules, the most important of which was forbidding anything from the human world to cross into the monster world.


Filmmakers Roundtable

The City


The Apartment

To successfully create a believable world in which monsters live, work, dine, and date, each individual prop and element of architecture had to be part of the whole approach for Monstropolis. The world needed to echo the human world and yet be monster specific. Details of Mike and Sulley’s apartment, one of the first sets to be developed, exemplified the depth of the thought process that played a part during the design stage of production. Brick buildings reinforced with steel, like those from the 1900s, felt like they could support monsters who weighed as much as 800 pounds. Household appliances ran on scream energy instead of electricity—so everything like the TV, stereo, and lighting hooked up to conduits that suggested a supply source similar to natural gas.

 

Boo's Room

For Boo’s room, Pixar artists strove to create a little girl’s room that was both appealing and inviting. The room reflected her personality and creativity; an easel stood in the corner, her artwork covered the walls, and evidence of interrupted pretend-games were strewn on the floor. It needed to feel personal, but also a bit idealized, to work with the story point that her room resembled a simulator room in the scream factory.

Meticulous care went into choosing every detail of the door that needed to be distinguishable from every other door in existence. The curves of the outlined contours, the shapes and placement of the flowers, and color choices were all intentional and deliberate.

 

The Factory

The factory took its shape inspired by images of post-World War II America and the dawn of the baby boom. The filmmakers decided Monsters, Inc. would have expanded heavily during this golden age of children to frighten. Then with the advent of violent films, television, and video games, the expansion would have stopped, leaving the Monsters, Inc. factory with its vintage assembly line and architectural design.

 

Monstropolis 

When the Pixar team set out to create a city of monsters, the possibilities were limitless. But they soon decided Monstropolis made more sense with a few facts: (1) Monsters have been around for as long as there have been frightened humans. The city should reflect this long history. (2) Monsters come in all shapes. Doors, telephones, and lockers must be usable by two-foot-tall monsters with tentacles as well as eleven-foot monsters with claws. (3) Most monsters are very heavy. The city would be built with strong, durable materials like brick, stone, and steel.

 

Colorscripts

A colorscript is a sequence of small pastel drawings or paintings used to emphasize color in each scene and establish a film's visual language.

For Monsters, Inc., Production Designer Harley Jessup teamed with Art Director Dominique Louis and Lighting Director Jean-Claude Kalache to explore the visual contradictions between a drab, workaday industrial town setting and its population of bright, candy-colored monsters straight out of a child’s imagination.

 
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Awards


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Awards


Academy Awards 2001
Winner for Best Music (Original Song)
"If I Didn't Have You" -
Randy Newman


Winner for Sound Editing
Gary Rydstrom
Michael Silver


Nominated for Best Animated Feature Film
Pete Docter
John Lasseter


Nominated for Best Music (Original Score)
Randy Newman

AC Nielsen EDI 2001
Gold Reel Recognition
Pete Docter

Annie Awards 2002
Winner for Outstanding
Character Animation
Doug Sweetland

Nominated for Outstanding Achievement
in an Animated Theatrical Feature

Nominated for Outstanding
Character Animation
John Kahrs

Nominated for Outstanding Character Design
in an Animated Feature Production
Ricky Nierva

Nominated for Outstanding Directing in
an Animated Feature Production
Pete Docter
Lee Unkrich
David Silverman


Nominated for Outstanding Music
in an Animated Feature Production
Randy Newman

Nominated for Outstanding Production
Design in an Animated Feature Production
Harley Jessup

Nominated for Outstanding Writing in an
Animated Feature Production
Andrew Stanton
Daniel Garson

Ars Electronica 2001
Awarded Golden Nica
Andrew Stanton
Lee Unkrich
Pete Docter,
David Silverman

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts 2001-2002
Winner for Children's - Feature Film
Darla K. Anderson
Pete Docter
Andrew Stanton
Daniel Gerson

Christian Movie Guide Awards
Awarded Christian Movie Guide Award, Best of 2001

Golden Trailer Awards
Awarded Golden Trailer Award

Grammy Awards 2002
Nominated for Best Score Soundtrack for a
Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media
Randy Newman

Winner for Best Musical Album For
Children ("Scream Factory Favorites)
Riders In the Sky

Nominated for Best Spoken
Word Album for ChIldren
Monsters, Inc. DVD Read Along

Nominated for Best Instrumental
Composition Written For A Motion Picture,
Television Or Other Visual media
"Ride of the Doors"
Randy Newman


Winner for Best Song Written for a
Motion Picture, Television or Other
Visual Media
"If I Didn't Have You" 
Randy Newman, songwriter

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Credits


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Credits


DIRECTED BY
Pete Docter

Co-DIRECTED BY
Lee Unkrich, David Silverman

PRODUCED BY
Darla K. Anderson

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS
John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
Kori Rae

ORIGINAL STORY BY
Pete Docter, Jill Culton, Jeff Pidgeon, Ralph Eggleston

SCREENPLAY BY
Andrew Stanton, Daniel Gerson

MUSIC BY
Randy Newman

FILM EDITOR
Jim Stewart

SUPERVISING TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
Thomas Porter

PRODUCTION DESIGNERS
Harley Jessup, Bob Pauley

ART DIRECTORS
Tia W. Kratter, Dominique Louis

STORY SUPERVISOR
Bob Peterson

SUPERVISING ANIMATORS
Glenn McQueen, Rich Quade

MODELING SUPERVISOR
Eben Ostby

SHADING SUPERVISOR
Rick Sayre

LIGHTING SUPERVISOR
Jean-Claude J. Kalache

LAYOUT SUPERVISOR
Ewan Johnson

SET DRESSING SUPERVISOR
Sophie Vincelette

SIMULATION & EFFECTS SUPERVISORS
Galyn Susman, Michael Fong

PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
Katherine Sarafian

SOUND DESIGNER
Gary Rydstrom

EXECUTIVE MUSIC PRODUCER
Chris Montan

CASTING BY
Ruth Lambert-C.S.A, Mary Hidalgo-Associate, Matthew Jon Beck-Associate
 

CAST
 

Mike
Billy Crystal

Sullivan
John Goodman

Boo
Mary Gibbs

Randall
Steve Buscemi

Waternoose
James Coburn

Celia
Jennifer Tilly

Roz
Bob Peterson

Yeti
John Ratzenberger

Fungus
Frank Oz

Smitty
Daniel Gerson

Needleman
Daniel Gerson

Floor Manager (Jerry)
Steve Suskind

Flint
Bonnie Hunt

Bile
Jeff Pidgeon

George
Sam "Penguin" Black