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Walle


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Walle


What if mankind had to leave Earth and somebody forgot to turn the last robot off? After hundreds of years doing what he was built for, WALL•E discovers a new purpose in life when he meets a sleek search robot named EVE. EVE comes to realize that WALL•E has inadvertently stumbled upon the key to the planet's future, and races back to space to report to the humans. Meanwhile, WALL•E chases EVE across the galaxy and sets into motion one of the most imaginative adventures ever brought to the big screen.


Trailers

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Character Design


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Character Design


Pantomime

The filmmakers decided that WALL•E should owe a silent debt to both R2-D2 and Buster Keaton, cinematic predecessors who proved how much can be conveyed without words. The robot would be the loneliest character Pixar had worked with, and the filmmakers crafted ways for him to perform the first act entirely in pantomime.


Go Live

Live Action

For the first time, a Pixar film featured brief scenes with live actors. While the studio had broken all kinds of ground in computer animation, the prospect of working on a traditional live-action set was enough to get the crew excited. Along with the rare chance to coach performances and see immediate results. the Pixar team was able to enjoy some serious catering.


Robo Everything!

WALL•E and Eve

Captain's Log


WALL•E

WALL•E (Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth-Class) is the last robot left on Earth, programmed to clean up the planet, one trash cube at a time. However, after 700 years, hes developed one little glitch—a personality. Hes extremely curious, highly inquisitive, and a little lonely.

 

EVE

EVE (Extra-Terrestrial Vegetation Evaluator) is a sleek, state-of-the-art probe-droid. She’s fast, she flies, and she’s equipped with a laser gun. EVE, also called Probe One by the captain of the Axiom (the enormous luxury mother ship which houses thousands of displaced humans), is one of a fleet of similar robots sent to Earth on an undisclosed scanning mission.

 

M-O 

M-O (Microbe-Obliterator) is a cleaner-bot programmed to clean anything that comes aboard the Axiom that is deemed a “foreign contaminant.” M-O travels speedily around the Axiom on his roller ball, cleaning the dirty objects he encounters.

 

Auto

Auto is the Axiom’s autopilot, who has piloted the ship through all of its 700 years in space. A carefully programmed robot in the form of the ship’s steering wheel, Auto’s manner is cold, mechanical, and seemingly dutiful to the captain. Unknown to all the Axiom crew, a hidden mandate exists in Auto’s programming. Auto is determined to execute these secret orders at any cost, regardless of the consequences for the inhabitants of the Axiom.

 

Captain

Captain is the current commander of the Axiom. Trapped in a routine, like WALL•E, the captain longs for a break in the tiresome cycle of his so-called life. His uneventful duties are simply checking and rechecking the ships status with Auto, the autopilot. When he is informed of a long-awaited discovery by one of the probe-droids, he discovers his inner calling to become the courageous leader he never could have imagined and plots a new course for humanity.

 

John and Mary

John and Mary are two of the humans living on the Axiom, where they have settled into a life of pampered luxury. The arrival of WALL•E jolts them from their daily routines and causes them to realize the existence of one another, and that there may be more to life than floating around on their high-tech deck chairs.

 
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World Design


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World Design


The Found World

"Science fiction typically involves a fantasy tale, often set in space or the future: therefore, everything (and I mean everything) is made up. And almost every member of our cast is a robot. The questions and demands of this world were nearly as infinite as space itself. But the goal was always clear—to make us believe this world already existed and that we, the filmmakers, had just simply found it," recalls director Andrew Stanton.


Building Worlds From The Sound Up

The Language of Sound

Set in a time and place yet to exist, WALL•E required an entirely original language of sound. Because the film featured few humans and almost no traditional dialogue, every beep or clank would have to mean something. To answer the challenge, the filmmakers turned to the father of modern sound design, legendary Star Wars veteran
Ben Burtt.


The Truck

Trash Planet

The Imperfect Lens


Earth

The dystopian planet of WALL•E was a blend of the fantastic and familiar. Audiences needed to recognize Earth but also understand how things had gone wrong on such a massive scale. In a short scene that followed WALL•E on his daily routine, the filmmakers wanted to reveal the planet's history in entirely visual terms. Dubbed The Walk Home, the segment used 10 of the most complicated sets ever created by Pixar, at the time, to tell a wordless, one-minute story.

 

Truck

Even a robot on a dystopian planet needs a place to call home. At first WALL•Es truck is enlivened only by a cockroach and a Hello, Dolly! video. The atmosphere changes when EVE comes in. We wanted it to feel really romantic, explains Danielle Feinberg, director of photography for lighting. So he plugs in a cord and turns on the Christmas lights hes got strung all over and you immediately feel were in this nice, cozy intimate interior and this is WALL•Es date night.

 

Space

Every film presents new opportunities for Pixar to interpret and design environments, imaginary or not. Using computers makes the art design choices as limitless as outer space. For WALL•E, the goal was not to reinvent space but to make design choices to enhance the story. The filmmakers wanted to ensure the audiences would be immersed in the story's action so they made a design choice to cheat the stars closer to camera than they would actually be in space so that the stars would move in the frame and allow the viewer to easily perceive the movement
of the characters.

 

Axiom

The luxury spaceship Axiom cuts an impressive profile. But unlike the mammoth space vehicles in most science fiction epics, it wasn’t designed to inspire fear or engage in deep space battle. Instead the Pixar team envisioned the last refuge of a consumer culture, a self-contained world built by the Buy n' Large Corporation, loaded with excess and wandering adrift with the remnants of human race.

 

Colorscripts

A colorscript is a sequence of small pastel drawings or paintings used to emphasize color in each scene and establish a
film's visual language.

"I started by separating the two worlds using color. Earth is dusty, high contrast, and monochromatic, to support the idea that WAL•Es life is drab and never changing. Then as EVE arrives and WALL•E cozies up to her, the colors become a little warmer. When we get to the Axiom its all about sterilitythe passengers dont have to think. The colors are more artificial, more planned, more consumer oriented. Its not gaudy, but theres a lot more color in Act Two  than most people anticipate," explains production designer Ralph Eggleston.

 

 
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Awards


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Awards


Academy Awards
Winner for Animated Feature Film
Andrew Stanton

Nominated for Music (Original Score)
Thomas Newman

Nominated for Music (Original Song)
"Down to Earth" - Music by Peter Gabriel
and Thomas Newman; Lyrics by Peter Gabriel


Nominated for Sound Editing
Ben Burtt and Matthew Wood

Nominated for Sound Mixing
Tom Myers, Michael Semanick and Ben Burtt

Nominated for Writing (Original Screenplay)
Andrew Stanton,
Jim Reardon
Original story by
Andrew Stanton,Pete Docter

Academy of Science Fiction Fantasy & Horror Films
Nominated for Saturn
Award for Best Animated Film

Nominated for Saturn Award
for Best Director
Andrew Stanton

Alliance of Women Film Journalists
Winner of EDA Award for
Best Screenplay,Original
Andrew Stanton
Pete Docter
Jim Reardon

American Cinema Editors
Winner of ACE Eddie Award for Best
Edited Feature Film (Comedy or Musical)
Stephen Schaffer

American Film Institute
Official Selection
AFI Movies of the Year

Annie Awards
Nominated for Best Animated Feature
Nominated for Best Animated Video Game:
Heavy Iron Studios, a division of THQ, Inc.

Nominated for Animated Effects
Enrique Vila

Nominated for Character Animation
in a Feature Production
Victor Navone

Nominated for Directing in an
Animated Feature Production
Andrew Stanton

Nominated for Production Design
in an Animated Feature Production
Ralph Eggleston

Nominated for Storyboarding
in an Animated Feature Production
Ronnie del Carmen

Nominated for Voice Acting in an
Animated Feature Production
Ben Burtt - Voice of Wall-E

Art Director's Guild & Scenic,
Title & Graphic Artists

Nominated for Excellence in Production
Design for a Feature Film: Fantasy Film
Ralph Eggleston
(production designer)

British Academy of Film and Television Arts
Winner for Animated Film
Andrew Stanton

Winner for Feature Film
Jim Morris
Andrew Stanton


Nominated for Music
Thomas Newman

Nominated for Sound
Ben Burtt
Tom Myers
Michaeel Semanick
Matthew Wood

The Boston Society of Film Critics
Winner for Best Picture

Winner for Best Animated Film

Broadcast Film Critics Association
Winner of Critics' Choice Award
for Best Animated Feature

Nominated for Critics'
Choice Award for Best Picture

Nominated for Critics' Choice
Award for Best Song:
"Down to Earth"Performed by Peter Gabriel,
written by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman


Nominated for Critics' Choice
Award for Film of the Year

The Chicago Film Critics Association
Winner for Best Picture

Winner for Best Original Screenplay:
Andrew Stanton and Jim Reardon

Winner for Best Animated Feature

Winner for Best Original Score:
Thomas Newman

Nominated for Best Director:
Andrew Stanton

Golden Globe Awards
Winner for Best Animated Feature Film

Nominated for Best Original Song:
"Down to Earth" 
performed by Peter Gabriel,
written by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman

Grammys
Winner for Best Song Written for
Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media:
Peter Gabriel & Thomas Newman, songwriters

Winner for Best Instrumental
Arrangement (Define Dancing):
Peter Gabriel & Thomas Newman, arrangers (Thomas Newman)

Nominated for Best Score Soundtrack Album
for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media:
Thomas Newman, composer

Hollywood Film Festival
Winner for Animation of the Year

International Press Academy
Winner of Satellite Award
for Motion Picture, Animated or Mixed Media

Nominated for Satellite Award for Original Score:
Thomas Newman

Nominated for Satellite Award for Sound
(Mixing and Editing)
Ben Burtt
Matthew Wood


Nominated for Satellite Award
for Original Song
"Down to Earth" -
Peter Gabriel

Kansas City Film Critics Circle
Winner of Loutzenhiser Award for Best Animated Film

Los Angeles Film Critics Association
Winner for Best Picture

Motion Picture Sound Editors Association
Winner of Golden Reel Award for Best
Sound Editing: Sound Effects,
Foley, Dialogue and ADR Animation
in A Feature Film

National Board of Review
Top Ten Films of the Year
Winner for Best Animated Feature

National Movie Award
Winner for Best Family Film

New York Film Critics Circle
Winner for Best Animated Film

Oklahoma Film Critics Circle
Top Ten Movies of the Year
Winner for Best Animated Film

Producers Guild of America Awards
Winner of Producer of the Year Award:
Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures
Jim Morris

Rolling Stone Magazine
Voted #5 movie of the year
by Rolling Stone film critics

Spike TV
Winner of Scream Award
for Best Breakout Performance

St. Louis Film Critics Association
Winner for Best Animated Film

Nominated for Best Picture

Nominated for Most Original,
Innovative or Creative Film

Nominated for Best Music
(Soundtrack or Score, Original or Adapted)

Utah Film Critics Association
Winner for Best
Achievement in Directing
Andrew Stanton

Winner for Best Animated Feature

Visual Effects Society
Winner for Outstanding Performance
by an Animated Character in a
Live Action Motion Picture

WALL-E and EVE Truck Sequence
Ben Burtt
Victor Navone
Austin Lee
Jay Shuster


Winner for Outstanding Animation
in an Animated Motion Picture
Andrew Stanton
Jim Morris
Lindsey Collins
Nigel Hardwidge


Winner for Outstanding Effects Animation
in an Animated Feature Motion Picture
Jason Johnston
Keith Daniel Klohn
Enrique Vila
Bill Watral

World Soundtrack Academy /
Ghent International Film Festival

Winner for Best Original
Song Written Directly for Film

Vancouver Film Critics Circle
Nominated for Best Film

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Credits


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Credits


DIRECTED BY
Andrew Stanton  

PRODUCED BY
Jim Morris

CO-PRODUCED BY
Lindsey Collins

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
John Lasseter

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER
Thomas Porter

ORIGINAL SCORE COMPOSED & CONDUCTED BY
Thomas Newman

ORIGINAL STORY BY
Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter

SCREENPLAY BY
Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon

PRODUCTION DESIGNER
Ralph Eggleston

FILM EDITOR
Stephen Schaffer

SUPERVISING TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
Nigel Hardwidge

SUPERVISING ANIMATORS
Alan Barillaro, Steven Clay Hunter

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY - CAMERA
Jeremy Lasky

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY - LIGHTING
Danielle Feinberg

SOUND & CHARACTER VOICE DESIGNER
Ben Burtt

PRODUCTION MANAGER
Andrea Warren

CHARACTER ART DIRECTOR
Jason Deamer

SETS ART DIRECTOR
Anthony Christov

SHADER ART DIRECTOR
Bert Berry

GRAPHICS ART DIRECTOR
Mark Cordell Holmes

CHARACTER SUPERVISOR
Bill Wise

SETS SUPERVISOR
David Munier

EFFECTS SUPERVISOR
David MacCarthy

TECHNICAL PIPELINE SUPERVISOR
JOHN WARREN

CHARACTER MODELING LEAD
Jason Bickerstaff

CHARACTER SHADING LEAD
Athena Xenakis

SET MODELING LEAD
Kristifir Klein

SET SHADING LEAD
Christopher M. Burrows

SET DRESSING LEAD
Derek Williams

CROWDS SUPERVISOR
Mark T. Henne

RENDERING SUPERVISOR
Susan Fisher

"DOWN TO EARTH" Music By
Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman

Lyrics By
Peter Gabriel

Performed By
Peter Gabriel, Featuring the Soweto Gospel Choir

CASTING BY
Kevin Reher, Natalie Lyon
 

CAST
 

WALL•E
Ben Burtt

EVE
Elissa Knight

Captain
Jeff Garlin

Shelby Forthright, BnL CEO
Fred Willard

Auto
Macintalk

M-O
Ben Burtt

John
John Ratzenberger

Mary
Kathy Najimy

Ship's Computer
Sigourney Weaver